The Doctor In The Victorian Novel

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The Doctor in the Victorian Novel

The Doctor in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: ,
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317035402
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The Doctor in the Victorian Novel by , Summary

With the character of the doctor as her subject, Tabitha Sparks follows the decline of the marriage plot in the Victorian novel. As Victorians came to terms with the scientific revolution in medicine of the mid-to-late nineteenth century, the novel's progressive distance from the conventions of the marriage plot can be indexed through a rising identification of the doctor with scientific empiricism. A narrative's stance towards scientific reason, Sparks argues, is revealed by the fictional doctor's relationship to the marriage plot. Thus, novels that feature romantic doctors almost invariably deny the authority of empiricism, as is the case in George MacDonald's Adela Cathcart. In contrast, works such as Wilkie Collins's Heart and Science, which highlight clinically minded or even sinister doctors, uphold the determining logic of science and, in turn, threaten the novel's romantic plot. By focusing on the figure of the doctor rather than on a scientific theme or medical field, Sparks emulates the Victorian novel's personalization of tropes and belief systems, using the realism associated with the doctor to chart the sustainability of the Victorian novel's central imaginative structure, the marriage plot. As the doctors Sparks examines increasingly stand in for the encroachment of empirical knowledge on a morally formulated artistic genre, their alienation from the marriage plot and its interrelated decline succinctly herald the end of the Victorian era and the beginning of Modernism.

The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels

The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels Pdf/ePub eBook Author: John Glendening
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317032462
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The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels by John Glendening Summary

Dominated by Darwinism and the numerous guises it assumed, evolutionary theory was a source of opportunities and difficulties for late Victorian novelists. Texts produced by Wells, Hardy, Stoker, and Conrad are exemplary in reflecting and participating in these challenges. Not only do they contend with evolutionary complications, John Glendening argues, but the complexities and entanglements of evolutionary theory, interacting with multiple cultural influences, thoroughly permeate the narrative, descriptive, and thematic fabric of each. All the books Glendening examines, from The Island of Doctor Moreau and Dracula to Heart of Darkness, address the interrelationship between order and chaos revealed and promoted by evolutionary thinking of the period. Glendening's particular focus is on how Darwinism informs novels in relation to a late Victorian culture that encouraged authors to stress, not objective truths illuminated by Darwinism, but rather the contingencies, uncertainties, and confusions generated by it and other forms of evolutionary theory.

Writing Death and Absence in the Victorian Novel

Writing Death and Absence in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: J. Zigarovich
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137007036
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Writing Death and Absence in the Victorian Novel by J. Zigarovich Summary

This book asks why Brontë, Dickens, and Collins saw the narrative act as a series of textual murders and resurrections? Drawing on theorists such as Derrida, Blanchot, and de Man, Zigarovich maintains that narrating death was important to the understanding of absence, separation, and displacement in an industrial and destabilized culture.

The Idea of the Gentleman in the Victorian Novel

The Idea of the Gentleman in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Robin Gilmour
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317207432
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The Idea of the Gentleman in the Victorian Novel by Robin Gilmour Summary

First published in 1981, this book represents the first comprehensive examination of Victorian society’s preoccupation with the ‘notion of the gentleman’ and how this was reflected in the literature of the time. Starting with Addison and Lord Chesterfield, the author explores the influence of the gentlemanly ideal on the evolution of the English middle classes, and reveals its central part in the novels of Thackeray, Dickens and Trollope. Combining social and cultural analysis with literary criticism, this book provides new readings of Vanity Fair and Great Expectations, a fresh approach to Trollope, and a detailed account of the various streams that fed into the idea of the gentleman.

Mobility in the Victorian Novel

Mobility in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Charlotte Mathieson
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 113754547X
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Mobility in the Victorian Novel by Charlotte Mathieson Summary

Mobility in the Victorian Novel explores mobility in Victorian novels by authors including Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Eliot and Mary Elizabeth Braddon. With focus on representations of bodies on the move, it reveals how journeys create the place of the nation within a changing global landscape.

The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels

The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels Pdf/ePub eBook Author: John Glendening
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317032470
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The Evolutionary Imagination in Late-Victorian Novels by John Glendening Summary

Dominated by Darwinism and the numerous guises it assumed, evolutionary theory was a source of opportunities and difficulties for late Victorian novelists. Texts produced by Wells, Hardy, Stoker, and Conrad are exemplary in reflecting and participating in these challenges. Not only do they contend with evolutionary complications, John Glendening argues, but the complexities and entanglements of evolutionary theory, interacting with multiple cultural influences, thoroughly permeate the narrative, descriptive, and thematic fabric of each. All the books Glendening examines, from The Island of Doctor Moreau and Dracula to Heart of Darkness, address the interrelationship between order and chaos revealed and promoted by evolutionary thinking of the period. Glendening's particular focus is on how Darwinism informs novels in relation to a late Victorian culture that encouraged authors to stress, not objective truths illuminated by Darwinism, but rather the contingencies, uncertainties, and confusions generated by it and other forms of evolutionary theory.

Degeneration, Normativity and the Gothic at the Fin de Siècle

Degeneration, Normativity and the Gothic at the Fin de Siècle Pdf/ePub eBook Author: S. Karschay
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137450339
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Degeneration, Normativity and the Gothic at the Fin de Siècle by S. Karschay Summary

This exciting new study looks at degeneration and deviance in nineteenth-century science and late-Victorian Gothic fiction. The questions it raises are as relevant today as they were at the nineteenth century's fin de siecle: What constitutes the norm from which a deviation has occurred? What exactly does it mean to be 'normal' or 'abnormal'?

Literature of an Independent England

Literature of an Independent England Pdf/ePub eBook Author: C. Westall,M. Gardiner
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137035242
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Literature of an Independent England by C. Westall,M. Gardiner Summary

Some of the most incisive writers on the subject rethink the relationship between Britain, England and English literary culture. It is premised on the importance of devolution, the uncertainty of the British union, the place of English Literature within the union, and the need for England to become a self-determining literary nation.

The Victorian Novel and Masculinity

The Victorian Novel and Masculinity Pdf/ePub eBook Author: P. Mallett
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 113749154X
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The Victorian Novel and Masculinity by P. Mallett Summary

What did it mean, in the rapidly changing world of Victorian England, to 'be a man'? In essays written specially for this volume, nine distinguished scholars from Britain and the USA show how Victorian novelists from the Brontës to Conrad sought to discover what made men, what broke them, and what restored them.

The Romantic Sublime and Middle-Class Subjectivity in the Victorian Novel

The Romantic Sublime and Middle-Class Subjectivity in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Stephen Hancock
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1135492999
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The Romantic Sublime and Middle-Class Subjectivity in the Victorian Novel by Stephen Hancock Summary

This study follows the aesthetic of the sublime from Burke and Kant, through Wordsworth and the Shelleys, into Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot and Hardy. Exploring the continuities between the romantic and Victorian "periods" that have so often been rather read as differences, the book demonstrates that the sublime mode enables the transition from a paradigm of overwhelming power exemplified by the body of the king to the pervasive power of surveillance utilized by the rising middle classes. While the domestic woman connected with the rise of the middle class is normally seen as beautiful, the book contends that the moral authority given to this icon of depth and interiority is actually sublime. The binary of the beautiful and the sublime seeks to contain the sublimity of womanhood by insisting on sublimity's masculine character. This is the book's most important claim: rather than exemplifying masculine strength, the sublime marks the transition to a system of power gendered as feminine and yet masks that transition because it fears the power it ostensibly accords to the feminine. This aesthetic is both an inheritance the Victorians receive from their romantic predecessors, and, more importantly, a broad historical phenomenon that questions the artificial boundaries between romantic and Victorian.

Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire

Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire Pdf/ePub eBook Author: U. Mukherjee
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137001135
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Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire by U. Mukherjee Summary

Natural Disasters and Victorian Empire looks at the relationship between epidemics and famines in south Asia and Victorian literature and culture. It suggests that much of how we think today about disasters, state and society can be traced back to the 19th-century British imperial experience.

Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel

Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Deborah Wynne
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134772335
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Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel by Deborah Wynne Summary

How key changes to the married women's property laws contributed to new ways of viewing women in society are revealed in Deborah Wynne's study of literary representations of women and portable property during the period 1850 to 1900. While critical explorations of Victorian women's connections to the material world have tended to focus on their relationships to commodity culture, Wynne argues that modern paradigms of consumerism cannot be applied across the board to the Victorian period. Until the passing of the 1882 Married Women's Property Act, many women lacked full property rights; evidence suggests that, for women, objects often functioned not as disposable consumer products but as cherished personal property. Focusing particularly on representations of women and material culture in Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Henry James, Wynne shows how novelists engaged with the vexed question of women's relationships to property. Suggesting that many of the apparently insignificant items that 'clutter' the Victorian realist novel take on new meaning when viewed through the lens of women's access to material culture and the vagaries of property law, her study opens up new possibilities for interpreting female characters in Victorian fiction and reveals the complex work of 'thing culture' in literary texts.

Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction

Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction Pdf/ePub eBook Author: K. Brindle
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137007168
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Epistolary Encounters in Neo-Victorian Fiction by K. Brindle Summary

Neo-Victorian writers invoke conflicting viewpoints in diaries, letters, etc. to creatively retrace the past in fragmentary and contradictory ways. This book explores the complex desires involved in epistolary discoveries of 'hidden' Victorians, offering new insight into the creative synthesising of critical thought within the neo-Victorian novel.

Purity and Contamination in Late Victorian Detective Fiction

Purity and Contamination in Late Victorian Detective Fiction Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Christopher Pittard
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317073088
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Purity and Contamination in Late Victorian Detective Fiction by Christopher Pittard Summary

Concentrating on works by authors such as Fergus Hume, Arthur Conan Doyle, Grant Allen, L.T. Meade, and Marie Belloc Lowndes, Christopher Pittard explores the complex relation between the emergence of detective fictions in the 1880s and 1890s and the concept of purity. The centrality of material and moral purity as a theme of the genre, Pittard argues, both reflected and satirised a contemporary discourse of degeneration in which criminality was equated with dirt and disease and where national boundaries were guarded against the threat of the criminal foreigner. Situating his discussion within the ideologies underpinning George Newnes's Strand Magazine as well as a wide range of nonfiction texts, Pittard demonstrates that the genre was a response to the seductive and impure delights associated with sensation and gothic novels. Further, Pittard suggests that criticism of detective fiction has in turn become obsessed with the idea of purity, thus illustrating how a genre concerned with policing the impure itself became subject to the same fear of contamination. Contributing to the richness of Pittard's project are his discussions of the convergence of medical discourse and detective fiction in the 1890s, including the way social protest movements like the antivivisectionist campaigns and medical explorations of criminality raised questions related to moral purity.

A New Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture

A New Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Herbert F. Tucker
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118624483
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A New Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture by Herbert F. Tucker Summary

The Victorian period was a time of rapid cultural change, which resulted in a huge and varied literary output. A New Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture offers experienced guidance to the literature of nineteenth-century Britain and its social and historical context. This revised and expanded edition comprises contributions from over 30 leading scholars who, approaching the Victorian epoch from different positions and traditions, delve into the unruly complexities of the Victorian imagination. Divided into five parts, this new companion surveys seven decades of history before examining the keys phases in a Victorian life, the leading professions and walks of life, the major Victorian literary genres, and the way Victorians defined their persons, their homes, and their national identities. Important topics such as sexuality, denominational faith, social class, and global empire inform each chapter’s approach. Each chapter provides a comprehensive bibliography of established and emerging scholarship.

Postal Plots in British Fiction, 1840-1898

Postal Plots in British Fiction, 1840-1898 Pdf/ePub eBook Author: L. Rotunno
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137323809
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Postal Plots in British Fiction, 1840-1898 by L. Rotunno Summary

By 1840, the epistolary novel was dead. Letters in Victorian fiction, however, were unmistakably alive. Postal Plots explores how Victorian postal reforms unleashed a new and sometimes unruly population into the Victorian literary marketplace where they threatened the definition and development of the Victorian literary professional.

Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-Century Novel

Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-Century Novel Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Catherine Delafield
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317201345
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Women's Diaries as Narrative in the Nineteenth-Century Novel by Catherine Delafield Summary

First published in 2009, this book investigates the cultural significance of nineteenth-century women’s writing and reading practices. Beginning with an examination of non-fictional diaries and the practice of diary writing, it assesses the interaction between the fictional diary and other forms of literary production such as epistolary narrative, the periodical, the factual document and sensation fiction. The discrepancies between the private diary and its use as a narrative device are explored through the writings of Frances Burney, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anne Brontë, Dinah Craik, Wilkie Collins and Bram Stoker. It also considers women as writers, readers and subjects and demonstrates ways in which women could become performers of their own story through a narrative method which was authorized by their femininity and at the same time allowed them to challenge the myth of domestic womanhood. This book will be of interest to those studying 19th century literature and women in literature.

Wilkie Collins (Authors in Context)

Wilkie Collins (Authors in Context) Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Lyn Pykett
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191517860
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Wilkie Collins (Authors in Context) by Lyn Pykett Summary

Wilkie Collins is mainly remembered for his best-selling sensation novel The Woman in White and his detective mystery The Moonstone , both published in the 1860s. However, in a literary career spanning nearly forty years he wrote over twenty novels, several plays, and numerous short stories in which his preoccupations with Victorian society are revealed. Irregular liaisons, the chaotic state of the marriage laws, social and psychological identity, and the interconnections between respectable society and the world of crime are recurring themes in Collins's fiction. Lyn Pykett looks at Collins's long and varied career in relation to the changing circumstances of his own life, a changing literary marketplace, and the changing worlds of nineteenth-century Britain, as well as his enduring legacy for modern writers and interpreters. The book includes a chronology of Collins's life and times, suggestions for further reading, websites, illustrations, and a comprehensive index. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels

Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Laurence Talairach-Vielmas
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317093909
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Moulding the Female Body in Victorian Fairy Tales and Sensation Novels by Laurence Talairach-Vielmas Summary

Laurence Talairach-Vielmas explores Victorian representations of femininity in narratives that depart from mainstream realism, from fairy tales by George MacDonald, Lewis Carroll, Christina Rossetti, Juliana Horatia Ewing, and Jean Ingelow, to sensation novels by Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Rhoda Broughton, and Charles Dickens. Feminine representation, Talairach-Vielmas argues, is actually presented in a hyper-realistic way in such anti-realistic genres as children's literature and sensation fiction. In fact, it is precisely the clash between fantasy and reality that enables the narratives to interrogate the real and re-create a new type of realism that exposes the normative constraints imposed to contain the female body. In her exploration of the female body and its representations, Talairach-Vielmas examines how Victorian fantasies and sensation novels deconstruct and reconstruct femininity; she focuses in particular on the links between the female characters and consumerism, and shows how these serve to illuminate the tensions underlying the representation of the Victorian ideal.

The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction

The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction Pdf/ePub eBook Author: Nicky Losseff
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317028058
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The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction by Nicky Losseff Summary

The Idea of Music in Victorian Fiction seeks to address fundamental questions about the function, meaning and understanding of music in nineteenth-century culture and society, as mediated through works of fiction. The eleven essays here, written by musicologists and literary scholars, range over a wide selection of works by both canonical writers such as Austen, Benson, Carlyle, Collins, Gaskell, Gissing, Eliot, Hardy, du Maurier and Wilde, and less-well-known figures such as Gertrude Hudson and Elizabeth Sara Sheppard. Each essay explores different strategies for interpreting the idea of music in the Victorian novel. Some focus on the degree to which scenes involving music illuminate what music meant to the writer and contemporary performers and listeners, and signify musical tastes of the time and the reception of particular composers. Other essays in the volume examine aspects of gender, race, sexuality and class that are illuminated by the deployment of music by the novelist. Together with its companion volume, The Figure of Music in Nineteenth-Century British Poetry edited by Phyllis Weliver (Ashgate, 2005), this collection suggests a new network of methodologies for the continuing cultural and social investigation of nineteenth-century music as reflected in that period's literary output.